PAST EVENTS

Wild Weed Kitchen

Untamed Food Distribution

In response to the the tension that exists between the escalating cost-of-living crisis and an emerging foraging 'crisis' suggested by conservation and heritage organisations, a little piece of land (artists Monika Dutta and Jake Harries) will be piloting Untamed Food Distribution during their current residency at Artbomb in Doncaster.

Using only wild foodstuffs collected from the half acre of rewilded gardens and copse around their home, Monika and Jake will be providing free packs of vegetables, ready prepared with cooking instructions, to any members of the public who want to try an alternative to industrially grown commercial supermarket produce.

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Full Circle

Yu-Chen Wang is a Taiwanese-British artist who lives and works in London. Her work asks fundamental questions about human identity at a key point in history, where eco-systems and techno-systems have become inextricably intertwined. At the same time, her Taiwanese origins, combined with a London-based career, have created a vision that is personal and autobiographical. She has exhibited internationally, including at Science Gallery London, Manchester Art Gallery, FACT(Liverpool), CCCB(Barcelona) and Taipei Fine Arts Museum, and recently received the Honorary Mention Collide International Award, CERN(Geneva).

Creating an immersive cinematic video installation, Yu-Chen Wang took railwayana as a starting point for exploring Doncaster’s relationship to coal. With the support of local historians, geologists and environmentalists, this collaborative inquiry into regeneration and rewilding looks at the landscape surrounding South Yorkshire in the context of two major crises we are facing: inequality and environment.

 

This poetic work dwells on our relationship to place, peat bogs, water, coal are dominant features within the local landscape formed through the layering of time and compression of matter. Pitheads, slag heaps, mining subsidence and flooding, the edgelands are still full of post-industrial scars and traces. All of which are revealed through evocative moving images and a soundscape, which portray and reflect on these problems within a global condition to re-imagine new routes into the future.

 

The artist’s research focuses on how technologies enable movement of people, goods and information, as well as exploitation of natural resources and labour; how the land and ecologies, even our planet, have been altered and transformed through these activities. In this anthropogenic environment, a new version of nature is emerging—wildlife and modernity clash, human and non-human worlds entangle—a coevolution of human communities and their landscapes.

 

Full Circle, although composed of images and places captured locally, asks us how Doncaster sits within a broader international landscape as we did once before.